score:124

Accepted answer
import java.io.IOException;
import javax.servlet.Filter;
import javax.servlet.FilterChain;
import javax.servlet.FilterConfig;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.ServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.ServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

@Component
public class SimpleCORSFilter implements Filter {

private final Logger log = LoggerFactory.getLogger(SimpleCORSFilter.class);

public SimpleCORSFilter() {
    log.info("SimpleCORSFilter init");
}

@Override
public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain chain) throws IOException, ServletException {

    HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) req;
    HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) res;

    response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", request.getHeader("Origin"));
    response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Credentials", "true");
    response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "POST, GET, OPTIONS, DELETE");
    response.setHeader("Access-Control-Max-Age", "3600");
    response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Content-Type, Accept, X-Requested-With, remember-me");

    chain.doFilter(req, res);
}

@Override
public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) {
}

@Override
public void destroy() {
}

}

No need extra define this filter just add this class. Spring will be scan and add it for you. SimpleCORSFilter. Here is the example: spring-enable-cors

score:0

check this one:

@Override
protected void configure(HttpSecurity httpSecurity) throws Exception {
    ...
            .antMatchers(HttpMethod.OPTIONS, "/**").permitAll()
    ...
}

score:0

Extending WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter class and overriding configure() method in your @EnableWebSecurity class would work : Below is sample class

@Override
protected void configure(final HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

         http
        .csrf().disable()
        .exceptionHandling();
         http.headers().cacheControl();

        @Override
        public CorsConfiguration getCorsConfiguration(final HttpServletRequest request) {
            return new CorsConfiguration().applyPermitDefaultValues();
        }
    });
   }
}

score:0

If originally your program doesn't use spring security and can't afford for a code change, creating a simple reverse proxy can do the trick. In my case, I used Nginx with the following configuration:

http {
  server {
    listen 9090;
    location / {
      if ($request_method = 'OPTIONS') {
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' '*';
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Methods' 'GET, POST, OPTIONS';
      #
      # Custom headers and headers various browsers *should* be OK with but aren't
      #
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Headers' 'DNT,User-Agent,X-Requested-With,If-Modified-Since,Cache-Control,Content-Type,Range';
      #
      # Tell client that this pre-flight info is valid for 20 days
      #
      add_header 'Access-Control-Max-Age' 1728000;
      add_header 'Content-Type' 'text/plain; charset=utf-8';
      add_header 'Content-Length' 0;
      return 204;
      }
      if ($request_method = 'POST') {
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' '*';
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Methods' 'GET, POST, OPTIONS';
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Headers' 'DNT,User-Agent,X-Requested-With,If-Modified-Since,Cache-Control,Content-Type,Range';
      add_header 'Access-Control-Expose-Headers' 'Content-Length,Content-Range';
      }
      if ($request_method = 'GET') {
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' '*';
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Methods' 'GET, POST, OPTIONS';
      add_header 'Access-Control-Allow-Headers' 'DNT,User-Agent,X-Requested-With,If-Modified-Since,Cache-Control,Content-Type,Range';
      add_header 'Access-Control-Expose-Headers' 'Content-Length,Content-Range';
      }

      proxy_pass http://localhost:8080;
    }
  }
}

My program listens to :8080.

REF: CORS on Nginx

score:0

This answer copies the @abosancic answer but adds extra safety to avoid CORS exploit.

Tip 1: Do not reflect the incoming Origin as is without checking the list of allowed hosts to access.

Tip 2: Allow credentialed request only for whitelisted hosts.

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import javax.servlet.Filter;
import javax.servlet.FilterChain;
import javax.servlet.FilterConfig;
import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.ServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.ServletResponse;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;
import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

@Component
public class SimpleCORSFilter implements Filter {

    private final Logger log = LoggerFactory.getLogger(SimpleCORSFilter.class);

    private List<String> allowedOrigins;

    public SimpleCORSFilter() {
        log.info("SimpleCORSFilter init");
        allowedOrigins = new ArrayList<>();
        allowedOrigins.add("https://mysafeorigin.com");
        allowedOrigins.add("https://itrustthissite.com");
    }

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain chain) throws IOException, ServletException {

        HttpServletRequest request = (HttpServletRequest) req;
        HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) res;

        String allowedOrigin = getOriginToAllow(request.getHeader("Origin"));

        if(allowedOrigin != null) {
            response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", allowedOrigin);
            response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Credentials", "true");
        }

        response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "POST, GET, OPTIONS, DELETE");
        response.setHeader("Access-Control-Max-Age", "3600");
        response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Content-Type, Accept, X-Requested-With, remember-me");

        chain.doFilter(req, res);
    }

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig filterConfig) {
    }

    @Override
    public void destroy() {
    }

    public String getOriginToAllow(String incomingOrigin) {
        if(allowedOrigins.contains(incomingOrigin.toLowerCase())) {
            return incomingOrigin;
        } else {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

score:0

Just Make a single class like, everything will be fine with this:

        @Component
        @Order(Ordered.HIGHEST_PRECEDENCE)
        public class MyCorsConfig implements Filter {

            @Override
            public void doFilter(ServletRequest req, ServletResponse res, FilterChain chain) throws IOException, ServletException {
                final HttpServletResponse response = (HttpServletResponse) res;
                response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
                response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "POST, PUT, GET, OPTIONS, DELETE");
                response.setHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Authorization, Content-Type, enctype");
                response.setHeader("Access-Control-Max-Age", "3600");
                if (HttpMethod.OPTIONS.name().equalsIgnoreCase(((HttpServletRequest) req).getMethod())) {
                    response.setStatus(HttpServletResponse.SC_OK);
                } else {
                    chain.doFilter(req, res);
                }
            }

            @Override
            public void destroy() {
            }

            @Override
            public void init(FilterConfig config) throws ServletException {
            }
        }

score:0

This is what has worked for me in order to disable CORS between Spring boot and React

@Configuration
public class CorsConfig implements WebMvcConfigurer {

    /**
     * Overriding the CORS configuration to exposed required header for ussd to work
     *
     * @param registry CorsRegistry
     */

    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
        registry.addMapping("/**")
                .allowedOrigins("*")
                .allowedMethods("*")
                .allowedHeaders("*")
                .allowCredentials(true)
                .maxAge(4800);
    }
}

I had to modify the Security configuration also like below:

        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            http.csrf().disable()
                    .cors().configurationSource(new CorsConfigurationSource() {

                @Override
                public CorsConfiguration getCorsConfiguration(HttpServletRequest request) {
                    CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
                    config.setAllowedHeaders(Collections.singletonList("*"));
                    config.setAllowedMethods(Collections.singletonList("*"));
                    config.addAllowedOrigin("*");
                    config.setAllowCredentials(true);
                    return config;
                }
            }).and()
                    .antMatcher("/api/**")
                    .authorizeRequests()
                    .anyRequest().authenticated()
                    .and().httpBasic()
                    .and().sessionManagement().sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS)
                    .and().exceptionHandling().accessDeniedHandler(apiAccessDeniedHandler());
        }

score:0

I was suprised to only find Eduardo Dennis pointing to the up-to-date solution which is much simpler & doesn't involve the need to write your own Filter classes: It's using the

  • org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.CrossOrigin annotation on your Controllers
  • and including and().cors() to your Spring Security configuration.

That's all you have to do!

You can use the @CrossOrigin annotation like this:

import org.springframework.stereotype.Controller;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.CrossOrigin;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/api")
@CrossOrigin
public class BackendController {
    ...
}

If you want to configure allowedHeaders, methods, origins and so on, you can simply add those values to the annotation like this: @CrossOrigin(origins = "http://localhost:50029", maxAge = 3600).

Using the @CrossOrigin annotation, the Spring Security configuration becomes extremely easy. Simply add and().cors() to your WebSecurityConfig.java class:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http
            .csrf().disable()
            .and().cors()
            ...
    }

That's all! You may delete your Filter/CORSFilter classes. If you want to add a global configuration, you can declare a CorsConfigurationSource also. See this great answer or this blog post by Sébastien Deleuze). There's also clearly stated by the Spring developers:

This approach supersedes the filter-based approach previously recommended.

Therefore the accepted answer is outdated. Here's also a fully working example project: https://github.com/jonashackt/microservice-api-spring-boot

score:0

To enable CORS Globally you need to make changes in two places:

1. Spring Boot:

@Configuration
public class CorsConfiguration extends WebMvcConfigurationSupport {  
    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
        registry.addMapping("/**").allowedOrigins("*").allowedMethods("*")
        .allowCredentials(true);
    }
}

You can do the same in WebMvcConfigurerAdapter, or create bean of WebMvcConfigurer.

2. Spring Security

@Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.cors().and()
                .authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers(HttpMethod.OPTIONS).permitAll() //Permits your preflight request
}

Works as on Spring Boot 2.3.3.RELEASE

score:0

The simple way is to create a bean in your spring boot application class(class with @SpringBootApplication) as below:

Note! i specified "http://localhost:4200" below on "setAllowedOrigins()" because am running the application on localhost and using angular default port.

@Bean
public CorsFilter corsFilter(){
    CorsConfiguration corsConfiguration = new CorsConfiguration();
    corsConfiguration.setAllowCredentials(true);
    corsConfiguration.setAllowedOrigins(Arrays.asList("http://localhost:4200"));
    corsConfiguration.setAllowedHeaders(Arrays.asList("Origin","Access-Control-Allow-Origin","Content-Type",
            "Accept", "Authorization", "Origin, Accept", "X-Requested-With",
            "Access-Control-Request-Method", "Access-Control-Request-Headers"));
    corsConfiguration.setExposedHeaders(Arrays.asList("Origin", "Content-Type", "Accept","Authorization",
            "Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "Access-Control-Allow-Credentials"));
    corsConfiguration.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("GET", "POST","PUT","DELETE","OPTIONS"));
    UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource urlBasedCorsConfigurationSource = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
    urlBasedCorsConfigurationSource.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", corsConfiguration);
    return new CorsFilter(urlBasedCorsConfigurationSource);
}

score:0

You can use this annotation on every restController class in sprıng boot

@CrossOrigin("*")

if you are using spring security you need to use this on any class with extended extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter

@Bean
CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
    CorsConfiguration configuration = new CorsConfiguration();
    configuration.setAllowedOrigins(Arrays.asList("https://example.com"));
    configuration.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("GET","POST"));
    UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
    source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", configuration);
    return source;
}

score:1

In our Spring Boot app, we have set up CorsConfigurationSource like this.

Sequence of adding allowedOrigns first and then setting applyPermitDefaultValues() let Spring set up default values for allowed headers, exposed headers, allowed methods, etc. so we don't have to specify those.

    public CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
        CorsConfiguration configuration = new CorsConfiguration();
        configuration.setAllowedOrigins(Arrays.asList("http://localhost:8084"));
        configuration.applyPermitDefaultValues();

        UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource configurationSource = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        configurationSource.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", configuration);
        return configurationSource;
    }
    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

        http.authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/api/**")
                .access("@authProvider.validateApiKey(request)")
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and().cors()
                .and().csrf().disable()
                .httpBasic().authenticationEntryPoint(authenticationEntryPoint);

        http.sessionManagement().sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS);
    }

score:2

Step 1

By annotating the controller with @CrossOrigin annotation will allow the CORS configurations.

@CrossOrigin
@RestController
public class SampleController { 
  .....
}

Step 2

Spring already has a CorsFilter even though You can just register your own CorsFilter as a bean to provide your own configuration as follows.

@Bean
public CorsFilter corsFilter() {
    final UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
    final CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
    config.setAllowedOrigins(Collections.singletonList("http://localhost:3000")); // Provide list of origins if you want multiple origins
    config.setAllowedHeaders(Arrays.asList("Origin", "Content-Type", "Accept"));
    config.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("GET", "POST", "PUT", "OPTIONS", "DELETE", "PATCH"));
    config.setAllowCredentials(true);
    source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", config);
    return new CorsFilter(source);
}

score:3

For me the only thing that worked 100% when spring security is used was to skip all the additional fluff of extra filters and beans and whatever indirect "magic" people kept suggesting that worked for them but not for me.

Instead just force it to write the headers you need with a plain StaticHeadersWriter:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

        http
            // your security config here
            .authorizeRequests()
            .antMatchers(HttpMethod.TRACE, "/**").denyAll()
            .antMatchers("/admin/**").authenticated()
            .anyRequest().permitAll()
            .and().httpBasic()
            .and().headers().frameOptions().disable()
            .and().csrf().disable()
            .headers()
            // the headers you want here. This solved all my CORS problems! 
            .addHeaderWriter(new StaticHeadersWriter("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*"))
            .addHeaderWriter(new StaticHeadersWriter("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "POST, GET"))
            .addHeaderWriter(new StaticHeadersWriter("Access-Control-Max-Age", "3600"))
            .addHeaderWriter(new StaticHeadersWriter("Access-Control-Allow-Credentials", "true"))
            .addHeaderWriter(new StaticHeadersWriter("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin,Accept,X-Requested-With,Content-Type,Access-Control-Request-Method,Access-Control-Request-Headers,Authorization"));
    }
}

This is the most direct and explicit way I found to do it. Hope it helps someone.

score:4

This is what worked for me.

@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfiguration extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

        http.cors();
    }

}

@Configuration
public class WebConfiguration implements WebMvcConfigurer {

    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
        registry
            .addMapping("/**")
            .allowedMethods("*")
            .allowedHeaders("*")
            .allowedOrigins("*")
            .allowCredentials(true);
    }

}

score:6

This works for me:

@Configuration
public class MyConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter  {
   //...
   @Override
   protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

       //...         

       http.cors().configurationSource(new CorsConfigurationSource() {

        @Override
        public CorsConfiguration getCorsConfiguration(HttpServletRequest request) {
            CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
            config.setAllowedHeaders(Collections.singletonList("*"));
            config.setAllowedMethods(Collections.singletonList("*"));
            config.addAllowedOrigin("*");
            config.setAllowCredentials(true);
            return config;
        }
      });

      //...

   }

   //...

}

score:10

Im using spring boot 2.1.0 and what worked for me was to

A. Add cors mappings by:

@Configuration
public class Config implements WebMvcConfigurer {
    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
        registry.addMapping("/**").allowedOrigins("*");
    }
}

B. Add below configuration to my HttpSecurity for spring security

.cors().configurationSource(new CorsConfigurationSource() {

    @Override
    public CorsConfiguration getCorsConfiguration(HttpServletRequest request) {
        CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
        config.setAllowedHeaders(Collections.singletonList("*"));
        config.setAllowedMethods(Collections.singletonList("*"));
        config.addAllowedOrigin("*");
        config.setAllowCredentials(true);
        return config;
    }
})

Also in case of a Zuul proxy you can use this INSTEAD OF A and B (just use HttpSecurity.cors() to enable it in Spring security):

@Bean
public CorsFilter corsFilter() {
    final UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
    final CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
    config.setAllowCredentials(true);
    config.addAllowedOrigin("*");
    config.addAllowedHeader("*");
    config.addAllowedMethod("OPTIONS");
    config.addAllowedMethod("HEAD");
    config.addAllowedMethod("GET");
    config.addAllowedMethod("PUT");
    config.addAllowedMethod("POST");
    config.addAllowedMethod("DELETE");
    config.addAllowedMethod("PATCH");
    source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", config);
    return new CorsFilter(source);
}

score:12

To build on other answers above, in case you have a Spring boot REST service application (not Spring MVC) with Spring security, then enabling CORS via Spring security is enough (if you use Spring MVC then using a WebMvcConfigurer bean as mentioned by Yogen could be the way to go as Spring security will delegate to the CORS definition mentioned therein)

So you need to have a security config that does the following:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

@Override
protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
    //other http security config
    http.cors().configurationSource(corsConfigurationSource());
}

//This can be customized as required
CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
    CorsConfiguration configuration = new CorsConfiguration();
    List<String> allowOrigins = Arrays.asList("*");
    configuration.setAllowedOrigins(allowOrigins);
    configuration.setAllowedMethods(singletonList("*"));
    configuration.setAllowedHeaders(singletonList("*"));
    //in case authentication is enabled this flag MUST be set, otherwise CORS requests will fail
    configuration.setAllowCredentials(true);
    UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
    source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", configuration);
    return source;
}

}

This link has more information on the same: https://docs.spring.io/spring-security/site/docs/current/reference/htmlsingle/#cors

Note:

  1. Enabling CORS for all origins (*) for a prod deployed application may not always be a good idea.
  2. CSRF can be enabled via the Spring HttpSecurity customization without any issues
  3. In case you have authentication enabled in the app with Spring (via a UserDetailsService for example) then the configuration.setAllowCredentials(true); must be added

Tested for Spring boot 2.0.0.RELEASE (i.e., Spring 5.0.4.RELEASE and Spring security 5.0.3.RELEASE)

score:29

If you want to enable CORS without using filters or without config file just add

@CrossOrigin

to the top of your controller and it work.

score:52

I had been into the similar situation. After doing research and testing, here is my findings:

  1. With Spring Boot, the recommended way to enable global CORS is to declare within Spring MVC and combined with fine-grained @CrossOrigin configuration as:

    @Configuration
    public class CorsConfig {
    
        @Bean
        public WebMvcConfigurer corsConfigurer() {
            return new WebMvcConfigurerAdapter() {
                @Override
                public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
                    registry.addMapping("/**").allowedMethods("GET", "POST", "PUT", "DELETE").allowedOrigins("*")
                            .allowedHeaders("*");
                }
            };
        }
    }
    
  2. Now, since you are using Spring Security, you have to enable CORS at Spring Security level as well to allow it to leverage the configuration defined at Spring MVC level as:

    @EnableWebSecurity
    public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
    
        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            http.cors().and()...
        }
    }
    

    Here is very excellent tutorial explaining CORS support in Spring MVC framework.


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