score:133

Accepted answer

From Java SE 8 onwards, users are asked to migrate to java.time (JSR-310). There are efforts on creating scala libraries wrapping java.time for scala such as scala-time. If targeting lower than SE 8 use one of the below. Also see Why JSR-310 isn't Joda-Time

Awesome scala lists many of the popular Scala DateTime apis


A new Scala wrapper for Joda Time. This project forked from scala-time since it seems that scala-time is no longer maintained.

import com.github.nscala_time.time.Imports._

DateTime.now // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-04-27T13:25:42.659-07:00

DateTime.now.hour(2).minute(45).second(10) // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-04-27T02:45:10.313-07:00

DateTime.now + 2.months // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-06-27T13:25:59.195-07:00

DateTime.nextMonth < DateTime.now + 2.months // returns Boolean = true

DateTime.now to DateTime.tomorrow  // return org.joda.time.Interval = > 2009-04-27T13:47:14.840/2009-04-28T13:47:14.840

(DateTime.now to DateTime.nextSecond).millis // returns Long = 1000

2.hours + 45.minutes + 10.seconds
// returns com.github.nscala_time.time.DurationBuilder
// (can be used as a Duration or as a Period)

(2.hours + 45.minutes + 10.seconds).millis
// returns Long = 9910000

2.months + 3.days
// returns Period

Joda Time is a good Java library, there is a Scala wrapper / implicit conversion library avaliable for Joda Time at scala-time created by Jorge Ortiz. (Note implicits have a performance hit, but it depends on what you do if you will notice. And if you run into a performance problem you can just revert to the Joda interface)

From the README:

USAGE:
  import org.scala_tools.time.Imports._

  DateTime.now
  // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-04-27T13:25:42.659-07:00

  DateTime.now.hour(2).minute(45).second(10)
  // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-04-27T02:45:10.313-07:00

  DateTime.now + 2.months
  // returns org.joda.time.DateTime = 2009-06-27T13:25:59.195-07:00

  DateTime.nextMonth < DateTime.now + 2.months
  // returns Boolean = true
  DateTime.now to DateTime.tomorrow
  // return org.joda.time.Interval =
  //   2009-04-27T13:47:14.840/2009-04-28T13:47:14.840

  (DateTime.now to DateTime.nextSecond).millis
  // returns Long = 1000
    
  2.hours + 45.minutes + 10.seconds
  // returns org.scala_tools.time.DurationBuilder
  // (can be used as a Duration or as a Period)
    
  (2.hours + 45.minutes + 10.seconds).millis
  // returns Long = 9910000 
    
  2.months + 3.days
  // returns Period

score:3

Everyone uses JodaTime, these Scala helper/wrapper libraries may need re-compilation with new versions of Scala. Jodatime is the only time library that's been around for a long time, and is stable and works reliably with every version of Scala.

score:5

MOTIVATION:

The Java Date and Calendar libraries are largely inadequate. They are mutable, not thread-safe, and very inconvenient to use.

The Joda Time library is a great replacement for Java's Date and Calendar classes. They're immutable by default, have a much richer and nicer API, and can easily be converted to Java's Date and Calendar classes when necessary.

This project provides a thin layer of convenience around the Joda Time libraries, making them more idiomatic to use within Scala.

(copied from https://github.com/jorgeortiz85/scala-time)

score:8

There is no standard way to work with dates in Scala. The options available are:

  1. Use java.time (if you are using Java 8) since it has the best of JODA time built into it. No implicits.
  2. Use nscala-time.
  3. Lamma date library (relatively new library on the scene)

I would avoid using java.util.Date due to the well-documented issues surrounding it.

score:13

If you are using Java 8, then there is no need to use nscala anymore. The Joda-Time library has been moved into Java 8 under the java.time package (JSR-310). Just import that package into your Scala project.


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