score:5

Accepted answer

This example is straight from Normalizr.

[{
  id: 1,
  title: 'Some Article',
  author: {
    id: 1,
    name: 'Dan'
  }
}, {
  id: 2,
  title: 'Other Article',
  author: {
    id: 1,
    name: 'Dan'
  }
}]

Can be normalized this way-

{
  result: [1, 2],
  entities: {
    articles: {
      1: {
        id: 1,
        title: 'Some Article',
        author: 1
      },
      2: {
        id: 2,
        title: 'Other Article',
        author: 1
      }
    },
    users: {
      1: {
        id: 1,
        name: 'Dan'
      }
    }
  }
}

What's the advantage of normalization?

You get to extract the exact part of your state tree that you want.

For instance- You have an array of objects containing information about the articles. If you want to select a particular object from that array, you'll have to iterate through entire array. Worst case is that the desired object is not present in the array. To overcome this, we normalize the data.

To normalize the data, store the unique identifiers of each object in a separate array. Let's call that array as results.

result: [1, 2, 3 ..]

And transform the array of objects into an object with keys as the id(See the second snippet). Call that object as entities.

Ultimately, to access the object with id 1, simply do this- entities.articles["1"].

score:0

You can use normalizr for this.

Normalizr takes JSON and a schema and replaces nested entities with their IDs, gathering all entities in dictionaries.

For example,

[{
  id: 1,
  title: 'Some Article',
  author: {
    id: 1,
    name: 'Dan'
  }
}, {
  id: 2,
  title: 'Other Article',
  author: {
    id: 1,
    name: 'Dan'
  }
}]

can be normalized to

{
  result: [1, 2],
  entities: {
    articles: {
      1: {
        id: 1,
        title: 'Some Article',
        author: 1
      },
      2: {
        id: 2,
        title: 'Other Article',
        author: 1
      }
    },
    users: {
      1: {
        id: 1,
        name: 'Dan'
      }
    }
  }
}

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