score:153

Accepted answer

useState hooks function argument is being used only once and not everytime the prop changes. You must make use of useEffect hooks to implement what you would call the componentWillReceiveProps/getDerivedStateFromProps functionality

import React,{useState , useEffect} from 'react';

const Persons = (props) =>  {
   const [nameState , setNameState] = useState(props)

   useEffect(() => {
       setNameState(props);
   }, [props])

   return (
            <div>
                <p>My name is {props.name} and my age is {props.age}</p>
                <p>My profession is {props.profession}</p>
            </div>
        )

}

export default Persons;

score:-1

I believe the problem indicates an attempt to use one conceptual variable or set of variables to do two different things. For example trying to get props.name and name to do the same thing.

So if

const [name, setName] = useState(props.name)

isn't enough and you find yourself trying to force props.name into state variable name later in the function then maybe name is being overloaded. Try setting up another state variable - eg. updatedName and see if things work better.

The original example doesn't demonstrate this problem since the state variables are never used except in log statements.

If const [name, setName] = useState(props.name) updated on ever re-render there would be no point in having state variable name since it would always be the same as props.name (and further attempts to change it would cause re-render).

score:0

I figured an alternative solution avoiding useEffect. Instead it uses two useState's. I put it into a custom hook for you:

export function useStateFromProp(propValue) {
  const [value,          setValue         ] = useState(propValue);
  const [propValueState, setPropValueState] = useState(propValue);

  if (propValueState != propValue) {
    setPropValueState(propValue);
    setValue(propValue);
  }

  return [value, setValue];
}


function MyComponent({ value: propValue }) {
  const [value, setValue] = useStateFromProp(propValue);

  return (...);
}

The main benefit would be that now the re-render that was normally triggered by the useEffect happens before any child components are re-rendered. so this would be faster.

Disclaimer: I did not test this yet. I did some googling and found this supporting article: https://pretagteam.com/question/in-react-hooks-when-calling-setstate-directly-during-render-is-the-rerender-guaranteed-to-run-before-the-render-of-children

score:0

If you need to calculate state from props and other state without additional re-renders, consider:

a) Using useMemo hook.

const Component = ({ name }) => {
  const [surname, setSurname] = useState('');

  const fullName = useMemo(() => {
     return name + ' ' + surname;
  }, [name, surname])

  ...
}

b) Calcuating inside render if it is not very heavy:

const Component = ({ name }) => {
  const [surname, setSurname] = useState('');

  const fullName = name + ' ' + surname;

  ...
}

c) For hard cases where you need to compare prev props and should be able to update state from another place you can use refs, though it doesn't look good:

const Component = ({ name }) => {
  const prevNameRef = useRef()
  const derivedState = useRef();

  if (prevNameRef.current !== name) {
    derivedState.current = ...
    prevNameRef.current = name;
  }
 
  // some other place
  derivedState.current = ...
}

score:1

import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react";

const Persons = props => {
  // console.log(props.name);

  const [nameState, setNameState] = useState(props);

  console.log(nameState.name);
  console.log(props.name);
  useEffect(
    () => {
      if (nameState !== props) {
        setNameState(props);
      }
    },
    [nameState]
  );
  return (
    <div>
      <p>
        My name is {props.name} and my age is {props.age}
      </p>
      <p>My profession is {props.profession}</p>
    </div>
  );
};

export default Persons;

As per the Hooks react document, all the time when any props is update or any update in component is there then useEffect will be called. So you need to check the condition before updating useState and then update your value so that it continuously doesn't do re-rendering

score:7

For that, you need to use the useEffect so your code looks like. As you want to avoid to re-render again if pros didn't change then you have to check first on useEffect and then set the props to current variable.

import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react";

const Persons = props => {
  // console.log(props.name);

  const [nameState, setNameState] = useState(props);

  console.log(nameState.name);
  console.log(props.name);
  useEffect(
    () => {
      if (nameState !== props.name) {
        setNameState(props.name);
      }
    },
    [nameState]
  );
  return (
    <div>
      <p>
        My name is {props.name} and my age is {props.age}
      </p>
      <p>My profession is {props.profession}</p>
    </div>
  );
};

export default Persons;

Demo

score:16

This general idea can be put into hook:

export function useStateFromProp(initialValue) {
  const [value, setValue] = useState(initialValue);

  useEffect(() => setValue(initialValue), [initialValue]);

  return [value, setValue];
}


function MyComponent({ value: initialValue }) {
  const [value, setValue] = useStateFromProp(initialValue);

  return (...);
}

score:31

The props value in useState(props) is used only during the initial render, further state updates are done with the setter setNameState.

In addition, there is no need for useEffect when updating derived state:

const Person = props => {
  const [nameState, setNameState] = useState(props.name);
  // update derived state conditionally without useEffect
  if (props.name !== nameState) setNameState(props.name);
  // ... other render code
};

From React docs:

[...] you can update the state right during rendering. React will re-run the component with updated state immediately after exiting the first render so it wouldn’t be expensive.

[...] an update during rendering is exactly what getDerivedStateFromProps has always been like conceptually.

In essence, we can optimize performance by getting rid of an additional browser repaint phase, as useEffect always runs after the render is committed to the screen.

Working example

This is a contrived example illustrating above pattern - in real code you would read props.name directly. See the React blog post for more appropriate derived state use cases.

const Person = props => {
  const [nameState, setNameState] = React.useState(props.name);
  // Here, we update derived state without useEffect
  if (props.name !== nameState) setNameState(props.name);

  return (
    <p>
      <h3>Person</h3>
      <div>{nameState} (from derived state)</div>
      <div>{props.name} (from props)</div>
      <p>Note: Derived state is synchronized/contains same value as props.name</p>
    </p>
  );
};

const App = () => {
  const [personName, setPersonName] = React.useState("Lui");
  const changeName = () => setPersonName(personName === "Lukas" ? "Lui" : "Lukas");

  return (
    <div>
      <Person name={personName} />
      <button onClick={changeName}>Change props</button>
    </div>
  );
};

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.13.0/umd/react.production.min.js" integrity="sha256-32Gmw5rBDXyMjg/73FgpukoTZdMrxuYW7tj8adbN8z4=" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.13.0/umd/react-dom.production.min.js" integrity="sha256-bjQ42ac3EN0GqK40pC9gGi/YixvKyZ24qMP/9HiGW7w=" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
<div id="root"></div>


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