score:214

Accepted answer

The problem is the way you're using forEach(), as it will always return undefined. You're probably looking for the map() method, which returns a new array:

var tifOptions = Object.keys(tifs).map(function(key) {
    return <option value={key}>{tifs[key]}</option>
});

If you still want to use forEach(), you'd have to do something like this:

var tifOptions = [];

Object.keys(tifs).forEach(function(key) {
    tifOptions.push(<option value={key}>{tifs[key]}</option>);
});

Update:

If you're writing ES6, you can accomplish the same thing a bit neater using an arrow function:

const tifOptions = Object.keys(tifs).map(key => 
    <option value={key}>{tifs[key]}</option>
)

Here's a fiddle showing all options mentioned above: https://jsfiddle.net/fs7sagep/

score:-9

I highly suggest you to use an array instead of an object if you're doing react itteration, this is a syntax I use it ofen.

const rooms = this.state.array.map((e, i) =>(<div key={i}>{e}</div>))

To use the element, just place {rooms} in your jsx.

Where e=elements of the arrays and i=index of the element. Read more here. If your looking for itteration, this is the way to do it.

score:3

You can use map function

{Object.keys(tifs).map(key => (
    <option value={key}>{tifs[key]}</option>
))}

score:4

const tifOptions = [];

for (const [key, value] of Object.entries(tifs)) {
    tifOptions.push(<option value={key} key={key}>{value}</option>);
}

return (
   <select id="tif" name="tif" onChange={this.handleChange}>  
      { tifOptions }          
   </select>
)

score:5

you could also just have a return div like the one below and use the built in template literals of Javascript :

const tifs = {1: 'Joe', 2: 'Jane'};

return(

        <div>
            {Object.keys(tifOptions).map((key)=>(
                <p>{paragraphs[`${key}`]}</p>
            ))}
        </div>
    )

score:8

When I use Object.entries with map, I use Array Destructuring like the following and just call them directly.

Object.entries(tifs).map(([key, value]) => (
    <div key={key}>{value}</div>
));

score:30

You can use it in a more compact way as:

const tifs = {1: 'Joe', 2: 'Jane'};
...

return (
   <select id="tif" name="tif" onChange={this.handleChange}>  
      { Object.entries(tifs).map((t,k) => <option key={k} value={t[0]}>{t[1]}</option>) }          
   </select>
)

And another slightly different flavour:

 Object.entries(tifs).map(([key,value],i) => <option key={i} value={key}>{value}</option>)  

Related Query

More Query from same tag