score:27

Accepted answer

You're experiencing this problem because you're using index as your key:

let nodes = items.map((item, index) => {
  let idx = index
  return (<Item key={index} value={item} index={index} _delete={this._onDelete}/>)
})

React uses the key property during virtual DOM diffing to figure out which element was removed, but indexes will never serve this purpose sufficiently.

Consider this example: you start off with the following array, which results in the following DOM structure:

const arr = [2, 4, 6, 8];

<li key={0}>2</li>
<li key={1}>4</li>
<li key={2}>6</li>
<li key={3}>8</li>

Then imagine you remove the element at index 2. You now have the following array, and the following DOM structure:

const arr = [2, 4, 8];

<li key={0}>2</li>
<li key={1}>4</li>
<li key={2}>8</li>

Notice that the 8 now resides in index 2; React sees that the difference between this DOM structure and the last one is that the li with key 3 is missing, so it removes it. So, no matter which array element you removed, the resulting DOM structure will be missing the li with key 3.

The solution is to use a unique identifier for each item in the list; in a real-life application, you might have an id field or some other primary key to use; for an app like this one, you can generate a incrementing ID:

let id = 0;
class List extends Component {
  constructor() {
    this.state = {
      items: [{id: ++id, value: 1}, {id: ++id, value: 2}]
    }

    // ...
  }

  _onClick(e) {
    this.state.items.push({id: ++id, value: Math.round(Math.random() * 10)})
    this.setState({items: this.state.items})
  }

  // ...

  render() {
    let items = this.state.items
    let nodes = items.map((item, index) => {
      let idx = index
      return (<Item key={item.id} value={item.value} index={index} _delete={this._onDelete}/>)
    })

    // ...
  }
}

Working example: http://jsbin.com/higofuhuni/2/edit


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