score:250

Accepted answer

Within the push method of hashHistory, you can specify your query parameters. For instance,

history.push({
  pathname: '/dresses',
  search: '?color=blue'
})

or

history.push('/dresses?color=blue')

You can check out this repository for additional examples on using history

score:0

I'm currently on react-router v5 in a running project and cannot easily migrate to v6. I wrote a hook that allows to read and modify a single URL param while leaving the other URL params untouched. Arrays are treated as lists of comma separated values: ?products=pipe,deerstalker,magnifying_glass

import { useCallback } from 'react';
import { useHistory } from 'react-router';

const getDecodedUrlParam = (name: string, locationSearch: string, _default?: any) => {
  const params = deserialize(locationSearch);
  const param = params[name];

  if (_default && Array.isArray(_default)) {
    return param
      ? param.split(',').map((v: string) => decodeURIComponent(v))
      : _default;
  }

  return param ? decodeURIComponent(param) : _default;
};

const deserialize = (locationSearch: string): any => {
  if (locationSearch.startsWith('?')) {
    locationSearch = locationSearch.substring(1);
  }
  const parts = locationSearch.split('&');
  return Object.fromEntries(parts.map((part) => part.split('=')));
};

const serialize = (params: any) =>
  Object.entries(params)
    .map(([key, value]) => `${key}=${value}`)
    .join('&');

export const useURLSearchParam = (name: string, _default?: any) => {
  const history = useHistory();
  const value: any = getDecodedUrlParam(name, location.search, _default);
  const _update = useCallback(
    (value: any) => {
      const params = deserialize(location.search);
      if (Array.isArray(value)) {
        params[name] = value.map((v) => encodeURIComponent(v)).join(',');
      } else {
        params[name] = encodeURIComponent(value);
      }
      history.replace({ pathname: location.pathname, search: serialize(params) });
    },
    [history, name]
  );
  const _delete = useCallback(() => {
    const params = deserialize(location.search);
    delete params[name];
    history.replace({ pathname: location.pathname, search: serialize(params) });
  }, [history, name]);
  return [value, _update, _delete];
};

score:0

I've made a simple hook to ease up the job.

Lets imagine your url is something like this: /search?origin=home&page=1

function useUrl(param: string) {

    const history = useHistory()
    const { search, pathname } = useLocation()
    const url = new URLSearchParams(search)

    const urlParam = url.get(param)
    const [value, setValue] = useState(urlParam !== null ? urlParam : '')

    function _setValue(val: string){
        url.set(param, val)
        history.replace({ pathname, search: url.toString() }); 
        setValue(val)
    }

    return [value, _setValue]
}

Then the actual usage:

function SearchPage() {

    const [origin] = useUrl("origin")
    const [page, setPage] = useUrl("page")

    return (
        <div>
            <p>Return to: {origin}</p>
            <p>Current Page: {page}</p>
        </div>
    )
}

score:0

react-router-dom v5 solution

  import { useHistory } from 'react-router-dom'; 
  const history = useHistory(); // useHistory hook inside functional component  
    
  history.replace({search: (new URLSearchParams({activetab : 1})).toString()});

it is recommended to use URLSearchParams as it can take care of spaces and special chars in query params while encoding and decoding the query params

    new URLSearchParams({'active tab':1 }).toString() // 'active+tab=1'
    new URLSearchParams('active+tab=1').get('active tab') // 1

score:1

I prefer you to use below function that is ES6 style:

getQueryStringParams = query => {
    return query
        ? (/^[?#]/.test(query) ? query.slice(1) : query)
            .split('&')
            .reduce((params, param) => {
                    let [key, value] = param.split('=');
                    params[key] = value ? decodeURIComponent(value.replace(/\+/g, ' ')) : '';
                    return params;
                }, {}
            )
        : {}
};

score:1

In my case typing into input field outputs it into browser's url as a query string, using React JS functional component as shown below


import React, { useEffect, useState } from 'react'
import { useHistory } from 'react-router-dom'

const Search = () => {
  const [query, setQuery] = useState('')
  const history = useHistory()

  const onChange = (e) => {
    setQuery(e.target.value)
  }

  useEffect(() => {
    const params = new URLSearchParams()
    if (query) {
      params.append('name', query)
    } else {
      params.delete('name')
    }
    history.push({ search: params.toString() })
  }, [query, history])

  return <input type="text" value={query} onChange={onChange} />
}

export default Search


browser's URL Query

/search?name=query_here

score:1

Like @Craques explained we can use the replace functionality instead of pushing a new route on every change. However, in version 6 of react-router, useHistory() was by replaced useNavigate(), which returns only a function. You can pass options to the function, to achieve the same effect as the old location.replace():

import { useLocation, useNavigate } from 'react-router-dom';
const to = { pathname: location.pathname, search: newParams.toString() };
navigate(to, { replace: true });

score:2

It can also be written this way

this.props.history.push(`${window.location.pathname}&page=${pageNumber}`)

score:3

From DimitriDushkin on GitHub:

import { browserHistory } from 'react-router';

/**
 * @param {Object} query
 */
export const addQuery = (query) => {
  const location = Object.assign({}, browserHistory.getCurrentLocation());

  Object.assign(location.query, query);
  // or simple replace location.query if you want to completely change params

  browserHistory.push(location);
};

/**
 * @param {...String} queryNames
 */
export const removeQuery = (...queryNames) => {
  const location = Object.assign({}, browserHistory.getCurrentLocation());
  queryNames.forEach(q => delete location.query[q]);
  browserHistory.push(location);
};

or

import { withRouter } from 'react-router';
import { addQuery, removeQuery } from '../../utils/utils-router';

function SomeComponent({ location }) {
  return <div style={{ backgroundColor: location.query.paintRed ? '#f00' : '#fff' }}>
    <button onClick={ () => addQuery({ paintRed: 1 })}>Paint red</button>
    <button onClick={ () => removeQuery('paintRed')}>Paint white</button>
  </div>;
}

export default withRouter(SomeComponent);

score:3

Using query-string module is the recommended one when you need a module to parse your query string in ease.

http://localhost:3000?token=xxx-xxx-xxx

componentWillMount() {
    var query = queryString.parse(this.props.location.search);
    if (query.token) {
        window.localStorage.setItem("jwt", query.token);
        store.dispatch(push("/"));
    }
}

Here, I am redirecting back to my client from Node.js server after successful Google-Passport authentication, which is redirecting back with token as query param.

I am parsing it with query-string module, saving it and updating the query params in the url with push from react-router-redux.

score:7

You can use hook useHistory Make sure that you're using function based component Import this at the top

import {useHistory} from "react-router-dom"

In your component,

const history = useHistory()
history.push({
    pathname: window.location.pathname,
    search: '?color=blue'
})

score:10

for react-router v4.3

const addQuery = (key, value) => {
  let pathname = props.location.pathname;
  // returns path: '/app/books'
  let searchParams = new URLSearchParams(props.location.search);
  // returns the existing query string: '?type=fiction&author=fahid'
  searchParams.set(key, value);
  this.props.history.push({
    pathname: pathname,
    search: searchParams.toString()
  });
};

const removeQuery = (key) => {
  let pathname = props.location.pathname;
  // returns path: '/app/books'
  let searchParams = new URLSearchParams(props.location.search);
  // returns the existing query string: '?type=fiction&author=fahid'
  searchParams.delete(key);
  this.props.history.push({
    pathname: pathname,
    search: searchParams.toString()
  });
};
function SomeComponent({ location }) {
  return <div>
    <button onClick={ () => addQuery('book', 'react')}>search react books</button>
    <button onClick={ () => removeQuery('book')}>remove search</button>
  </div>;
}

To know more on URLSearchParams from Mozilla:

var paramsString = "q=URLUtils.searchParams&topic=api";
var searchParams = new URLSearchParams(paramsString);

//Iterate the search parameters.
for (let p of searchParams) {
  console.log(p);
}

searchParams.has("topic") === true; // true
searchParams.get("topic") === "api"; // true
searchParams.getAll("topic"); // ["api"]
searchParams.get("foo") === null; // true
searchParams.append("topic", "webdev");
searchParams.toString(); // "q=URLUtils.searchParams&topic=api&topic=webdev"
searchParams.set("topic", "More webdev");
searchParams.toString(); // "q=URLUtils.searchParams&topic=More+webdev"
searchParams.delete("topic");
searchParams.toString(); // "q=URLUtils.searchParams"

score:23

You can use the replace functionality instead of pushing a new route on every change

import React from 'react';
import { useHistory, useLocation } from 'react-router';

const MyComponent = ()=>{
   const history = useHistory();
   const location = useLocation();

   const onChange=(event)=>{
     const {name, value} = event?.target;
     const params = new URLSearchParams({[name]: value });
     history.replace({ pathname: location.pathname, search: params.toString() });       
   }

   return <input name="search" onChange={onChange} />
}

This preserves the history instead of pushing a new path on every change

Update - February 2022 (V6)

As pointed out by Matrix Spielt useHistory was replaced by useNavigate to make the changes. There is also a convenient method for this called useSearchParams I only got to read the documentation and have not run this but this should work

import React from 'react';
import { useSearchParams } from 'react-router-dom';
// import from react-router should also work but following docs
// import { useSearchParams } from 'react-router';

const MyComponent = ()=>{
   const [searchParams, setSearchParams] = useSearchParams();

   const onChange=(event)=>{
     const {name, value} = event?.target;
     setSearchParams({[name]: value})       
   }

   return <input name="search" onChange={onChange} />
}

score:48

Example using react-router v4, redux-thunk and react-router-redux(5.0.0-alpha.6) package.

When user uses search feature, I want him to be able to send url link for same query to a colleague.

import { push } from 'react-router-redux';
import qs from 'query-string';

export const search = () => (dispatch) => {
    const query = { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe' };

    //API call to retrieve records
    //...

    const searchString = qs.stringify(query);

    dispatch(push({
        search: searchString
    }))
}

score:48

John's answer is correct. When I'm dealing with params I also need URLSearchParams interface:

this.props.history.push({
    pathname: '/client',
    search: "?" + new URLSearchParams({clientId: clientId}).toString()
})

You might also need to wrap your component with a withRouter HOC eg. export default withRouter(YourComponent);.


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